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Bosnia
Faking Democracy After Dayton

Product Description

‘Chandler’s book deserves urgent and serious attention by all those who care about the future of Bosnia, Balkan stability, and above all, democracy – before the corrosive effect of justifiable cynicism takes hold.’ Susan L. Woodward, Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution

‘A devastating analysis.’ Simon Jenkins, The Times

‘A welcome contribution to the debate over Western intervention in Bosnia... For a detailed discussion oft he Dayton Peace Accord, there is no better book on the market.’ Millennium: Journal of International Studies

The Dayton Accords brought the Bosnian war to an end in November 1995, establishing a detailed framework for the reconstitution of the Bosnian state and its consolidation through a process of democratisation.

In Bosnia David Chandler makes the first in-depth critical analysis of the policies and impact of post-Dayton democratisation. Drawing on interviews with key officials within the OSCE in Bosnia and extensive original research exploring the impact of policies designed to further political pluralism, develop multi-ethnic administrations, protect human rights and support civil society, Chandler reveals that the process has done virtually nothing to develop democracy in this troubled country. Political autonomy and accountability are now further away than at any time since the outbreak of the Bosnian war.

The Afterword to this new edition updates Bosnian developments and adds an analysis of the structures and problems of the international protectorate in Kosovo.

About The Author

David Chandler is Professor of International Relations, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster. He has written widely on democracy, human rights and international relations and is also the author of From Kosovo to Kabul: Human Rights and International Intervention (Pluto Press) and Constructing Global Civil Society: Morality and Power in International Relations (2004), editor of Rethinking Human Rights: Critical Approaches to International Politics (2002) and Peace without Politics: Ten Years of State-Building in Bosnia (2005), and co-editor of Global Civil Society: Contested Futures (2005).

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